Can You Play X-Box by Candlelight?

A WebQuest for 7th & 8th Grade History

Designed by Greg English
Calcasieu Parish Schools

greg.english@cpsb.org

Introduction | Task | Process | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits | Teacher Page


Introduction

Children today spend over 1500 hours a year in front of a TV or about 62 straight days and nights. This total is more than any other country in the world today. In comparison; they only spend about 900 hours (or 37 days and nights) in a classroom and even less time outdoors. 

Howver, that was not always the case. In the 1700s there were no game-boys, play-stations, x-boxes, or computers. Heck, there wasn't even any TV, radio, CD player, cellphone or pager. There wasn't even any electricity. Top that off with the fact that basketball won't be invented till 1891. 

If electricity hasn't been invented yet, what’s a kid supposed to do for fun?

You are about to find out and experience life in the 18th century. In other words, you will be "toying" with your life. 




This lesson was developed as part of the Calcasieu Parish School Board's I-TEC Project and CPSB WebQuest Class.

 

Task

Your task is to learn about the games children played in the late 1700s and early 1800s. You will describe what you might be playing in your free time today had electricity not been invented yet. You will choose one game and learn the rules and demonstrate how it was played.

You will make the game pieces and or board, complete a comparison worksheet and create a power-point of the directions and rules, and then demonstrate the game to your classmates. You will describe your alternate childhood had electricity not been invented yet.


Process

  • Part One
    • Look over each game listed below
    • Select three games or toys from the list.
    • Complete left side of Comparison Worksheet
    • Decide what current game or toy would compare to the one you selected on the left side of the worksheet. Complete form.
  • Part Two
    • Using the information you have complete on the Comparison Worksheet, you will create three Power-Point Slides - one for each game chosen - using the Power-Point Template provided here.
    • Save your Power-point to the desktop file provided for by your teacher.
  • Part Three
    • Select one game or toy that you have researched.
    • Create a model of that toy or game to present to the class.
    • Learn the rules or mechanics of the toy or game.
    • Present a demonstration to the class.
  • Part Four
    • Using the rubric provide on the quest or the printable copy, self grade your work.
    • Turn in a copy to teacher following your presentations.
    • For addition research, links have been provided in the Conclusion of this quest.

Games of the 18th Century


Evaluation

Your performance will be evaluated by use of the rubric below. You will receive an individual grade. To print out a rubric click HERE.
 
.Beginning
Gamesman
1
Developing
Gamesman
2
Accomplished
Gamesman
3
Exemplary
Gamesman
4
 Section
Score

3-Game
Selection
and
worksheet
More than one requirement was not completely met.  One requirement was not completely met. All requirements are met.  All requirements are met, completed, and exceeded. .

Power-Point
Slide One

(part 1)

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. PPt Slide includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors. Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good.  PPt Slide covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. .

Power-Point
Slide Two

(part 1)
 

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. PPt Slide includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors. Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good. PPt Slide covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. .

Power-Point
Slide Three

(part 1)

 

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. PPt Slide includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors. Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good. PPt Slide covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. .

Model
of Game

(part 2)

The student uses no game props OR the props or poorly made which detract from the presentation.  Student uses game prop
that shows some work to make the presentation. 
Students game prop shows some work/creativity and which make the presentation better.  Student's
game model shows considerable work/creativity
and research which makes the presentation better. 
.

Knowledge
of Game
Rules

(part 2)

Does not seem to understand the topic or game rules very well.  Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic and game rules. Shows a good understanding of the topic and game rules.  Shows a full understanding of the topic and game rules.  .

Game
Demonstration
and
Presentation

(part 2)

Student does not seem at all prepared to present. The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals.  Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. .
TOTAL
POINTS
. . . . .


Conclusion

Have things really changed that much in 200 years? Did the games of the 18th century require skill? Thinking? Hand-eye coordination? Concentration? Chance? Luck? Repetitiveness? Were there any games that were harder to do that the games or toys of the 21st century? Why? Why not? Make a list for extra credit of games that you play today that do not require electricity or technology in some form.

If history can tell you about children’s lives, what can it tell us about other peoples lives? What other things might you want to learn about?

For more on the 18th century explore the following links:

Colonial America 1600-1775
Kid Info: The American Revolution


Credits & References

The idea for this webquest came from a technology class taught by Dale Van Eck during the 2003 Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute. A word of thanks also goes to Kim LeBlanc of the Calcasieu Parish School Board Tech Department for pushing me to get this finished on time. I also wish to thank the facilitators at LouisianaVoices for the great photos of Creole Louisiana toys and games. You can find this quest and others at my own website Louisiana101.com. You can find other great webquests and the latest version of this template and training materials at The WebQuest Page and the Design Patterns.

"We all benefit by being generous with our work. Permission is hereby granted for other educators to copy this WebQuest, update or otherwise modify it, and post it elsewhere provided that the original author's name is retained along with a link back to the original URL of this WebQuest. On the line after the original author's name, you may add Modified by (your name) on (date). If you do modify it, please let me know and provide the new URL."



 


Last updated on (7/21/03). Based on a template from The WebQuest Page